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Lee Wastler Trainer
1. Understand that a puppy is an infant dog – not a miniature adult. Adjust your expectations accordingly, considering his physical and mental limitations. Before you know it, he will be grown up!

2. Puppy-proof your house with baby gates, a crate, and/or a pen. Any time the puppy is not directly supervised, he should be in a safe place where he can’t get into trouble. Provide appropriate safe toys for him to chew. Nobody would think of giving a human toddler total freedom in a home, and puppies need the same careful supervision. Eliminating opportunities for accidents and destructive behavior will get you through the puppy phase with most of your stuff intact! This helps make sure that bad habits never get a chance to take hold.

3. Dogs are not born understanding English. The new puppy you brought home two days ago has no idea what the word “no” means. Instead of expecting him to drop whatever it is he’s doing, show him what you want him to do instead.

4. Learn about dog body language. Your dog may not be able to talk, but he can tell you how he feels. This is a good place to start learning what he’s saying: http://www.akc.org/content/entertainment/articles/how-to-read-dog-body-language/


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5. Train with high-value treats. You will be amazed at how much harder your dog will work for a tiny piece of chicken breast, cheese, or liver, compared to even premium store-bought treats. Those may work in distraction-free settings, but when the job gets more difficult, you need to bring out the good stuff. Training treats should be soft, so you don't have to wait for Rover to chew before continuing the lesson.

6. Catch your dog being good. It’s easy to get caught up in scolding when your puppy is getting into trouble, but rewarding him out of the blue for being good lets him know he’s doing the right thing.

7. He’s a dog, not a human. It’s their “doggyness,” not what we think of as their similarity to humans, that makes them so lovable. Dogs don’t think like humans. They do not plot acts of revenge; they are just trying to do what makes them feel happy or safe.

8. Dogs do the things that we reinforce. Those behaviors you don’t like? We usually have ourselves to thank. Owners inadvertently reinforce all kinds of undesirable things, from excessive barking at the doorbell to counter surfing. Keep leaving food within reach on the counter, and your dog will learn that it’s worth his while to check.

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9. Learn to be quick with treats and praise. If the treat comes more than a few seconds after your pup has done what you’ve asked, he has no idea what he did to earn it, or you may inadvertently reward the wrong behavior. He’s happy to take it, but you failed to reward what you were teaching.

10. Always be happy when your dog comes to you, whether you called him or not. A common owner complaint is that the dog does not come when called. Never punish your dog when he comes to you, no matter what he did before. Call him in a happy, playful tone and reward big when he gets to you, with treats, a toy, or praise.

11. Keep a positive attitude. If you are getting upset, your dog knows it!

12. Provide the right amount of exercise and mental stimulation. Bored dogs get into trouble. For young puppies, mental stimulation is just as tiring as physical exercise and is safer for their growing bodies.

Lee Wastler Nov 8 '17
Admin Admin
Hey! Just wanted to let ya know, It's official that we will be making short training blogs. We never done anything like this before. We never take photos of our training sessions at our customers do to privacy & health issues for service dog training. That is why you always see the Play times. As you know we do not offer class training because we are a private in-home pet service company.

So with that said we will create short blogs explaining different training & grooming processes. During the winter months. When it becomes spring and we get permission with our customers we will video our training and grooming.

Just remember we are new to the video aspect of things so ya...... It may be cringy! LOL 
Admin Nov 3 '17 · Tags: 2bk9llc
Lee Wastler Trainer
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Lee Wastler Nov 2 '17
Lee Wastler Trainer

Whether you’re moving to another state, or you’ve just adopted a new friend, here’s everything you need to know about finding a veterinarian that’s right for you.

Look for AAHA accreditation

It’s a good idea to choose an animal hospital that’s been accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). Animal hospitals that choose to be accredited show they are committed to meeting -- or exceeding -- standards in a variety of different areas (approximately 900 standards, to be exact). An AAHA-accredited hospital goes above and beyond. They must prove to a third-party (AAHA) that they consistently provide the safest, highest quality care.

Hospitals that are accredited by AAHA meet high veterinary care standards. Each hospital voluntarily completes a detailed evaluation of its services and equipment. Then a practice consultant thoroughly evaluates the hospital to make sure it meets AAHA’s high standards in the areas of:

  • emergency services
  • pain management
  • contagious diseases
  • surgery and anesthesia
  • radiology services
  • pathology services
  • nursing care
  • diagnostic and pharmacy
  • dentistry
  • examination facilities
  • pet medical records
  • medical library
  • housekeeping and maintenance

An easy way to find AAHA-accredited hospitals is with the American Animal Hospital Association Hospital Locator.

Ask people like you

Get recommendations from friends or coworkers who feel the same way about their pets as you do. If you consider your pet a member of your family, ask people who think the same way.

If you’re moving far away

If you’re moving to another area, ask your current veterinarian for a recommendation. Area veterinary medicine associations also have lists of active members, often with special interests such as avian and exotic medicine.

Tour the practice

When you find an animal practice you think you like, ask for a tour. The hospital should be proud to show you its facility. During the tour ask yourself the following:

  • Is it clean?
  • Do the animals seem comfortable and safe?
  • Are dogs and cats separated?
  • Does the equipment look up-to-date?
  • Is there too much clutter?
Schedule a "get acquainted" meeting

The worst time to find a veterinarian is when your pet becomes ill and really needs one. Instead, schedule a brief get acquainted meeting so you and your pet can meet with the veterinarian. This meeting will allow you to ask about hospital practices and determine if this hospital is the “right fit” for both you and your pet. An effective veterinarian-owner-pet relationship is a partnership and communication is key.

Should your veterinarian have a specialty?

If you have a bird, you’ll want to find an avian animal veterinarian. If you have a fish, look for an aquatic animal veterinarian. Veterinarians should be able to care for all other types of animals. This includes the many different breeds of cats and dogs.

7 questions to ask a veterinary hospital

When considering a veterinarian, some basic questions you might ask:

  1. Can you request an appointment with a certain veterinarian? The answer should be yes.
  2. Do you have a large network of specialists if needed? The answer should be yes.
  3. What is your telephone policy? They should have educated staff available to answer your questions over the phone. But you should always be able to leave the veterinarian a message to call you back.
  4. What is your response to emergencies? If your pet has a serious emergency (automobile accident), the hospital should be able to see you immediately or arrange for your pet to go to another hospital that can.
  5. How long should I have to wait to schedule a routine appointment? Most practices should be able to schedule an appointment within a couple days to a week, depending on how busy they are, and how urgent your pet’s needs are.
  6. What types of payment methods do you offer? Ask the practice to make sure that they are set up to accept the types of payments you need.
  7. Do you have an email system where I can schedule appointments and ask questions? An increasing number of practices offer online services. Ask to see if they offer these types of services.

Keeping your pet healthy is very important. But your veterinarian can’t do it alone. It’s up to you to work in partnership with your veterinarian to give your pet the care he/she needs to live a healthier, happy life.

Lee Wastler Trainer

How does a dog get therapy-dog certification?

In order to be certified as a therapy dog or emotional support dog, animals need to receive an evaluation/written designation from a licensed health professional: social worker, physician, psychiatrist typically. As for service dogs, which are allowed to accompany their owners into most businesses and pet-restricted areas, they can receive training, certifications, and registrations from several organizations such as TDI and United States Service Dog Registry. These certifications are not required by the Americans with Disabilities Act, but may streamline the process of getting a dog access to typically off-limits areas. Service dogs and therapy dogs are not the same thing. The same dog might fall into both categories, but therapy and emotional support animals are not recognized under the ADA.

Lee Wastler Oct 27 '17
Admin Admin
We are thinking of starting training videos for our site. Let us know what ya think!! Thanks
Admin Oct 25 '17
Lee Wastler Trainer
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Lee Wastler Oct 23 '17
Lee Wastler Trainer
We had fun and met a lot of awesome people at the pet expo!

Lee Wastler Oct 22 '17
Admin Admin
2BK9 LLC now has online services for pet lovers! Get your pets domain name and start a website, blog or what ever you can think of. Visit us at www.2bk9.we.bs for more info!


Admin Oct 20 '17
Admin Admin
Don't forget to visit us at the Altoona Pet Expo in Altoona, PA October 18, 2017. We can't wait to see ya!!!
Admin Oct 10 '17
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